• One Thousand Witches Arrested!


    Ok, I thought we could get some perspective here, especially us jaded Zimbabweans within Zimbabwe.

    The President of Gambia, (above with his wife at a campaign rally) has had 1 000 witches "arrested" in a "smelling out" operation undertaken by witch-hunters from neighbouring Guinea. This was after the death of the president's beloved aunt, which death he publicly blamed on witchcraft.

    Quite frankly, I do not see what the alleged witches had to complain about. They were not taken to a prison, but to a farm, where they were "forced to drink unkown substances that cause(d) them to hallucinate and behave erratically."!

    So, they were taken to a farm where they were plied with alcohol or some exotic concoction that got them high? And they are complaining?

    Thing is, apparently, this concoction induced deadly kidney reactions to at least two of the "abductees". Their deaths were said to be proof of their guilt.

    The same president of Gambia has also claimed that he can cure AIDS. He has set up a hospital within the State House where he treats sufferers.

    To top it all, the person who first reported on this story in a local Gambian newspaper has since been arrested and charged with spying and sedition.

    Now, I ask you, do you think that we have it at least half-good in Zimbabwe, inspite of the best efforts of our leaders to destroy us completely?

    Just a question, to get some perspective, I thought. 

    Oh, the story comes from the British Telegraph, coming out of London.

4 comments:

  1. RE Ausetkmt says:

    WOW, I am Very Happy that I was not in Gambia at the time or I would have turned him into a frog and his wife a snake, so we could have enjoyed a buffet of evil delight.

    Somepeople need to meet their double on the street and have that said double act out their reverse side on them, quite suddenly.

    could you imagine if that happened to Mugabe ?
    Or hell forbid Pimpin ASS President Jammeh,
    he's about one sick phuck.

  1. Thokozile says:

    That is a very interesting topic. I would like to focus not on the good or bad, right or wrong of what has happened in the Gambia, but on Witch-Craft. In Zimbabwe the colonial government introduced a law that made it criminal to accuse some one of practising witchcraft “Witchcraft Suppression Act”. This law has since been replaced by a section of the Criminal Codification and Reform Act, which now recognises that witchcraft does exist and one who uses witchcraft to harm or kill or threatens to do so can be prosecuted. In actual fact now you can escape arrest if you accuse some one of witchcraft, provided you can provide convincing proof that such accusation false within the precincts of the law.
    This was to do with Western practices and beliefs, against African customs, traditions and beliefs. This is about super-natural powers. Although in Europe many centuries ago they used to have the same witchcraft beliefs and used to stone to death those accused of being witches. They abandoned that for their own reasons and good, but we still have westerners who practice super-natural powers,e.g. psychics, etc.
    The Westerners in recent developments seem to accept supernatural powers that are done in the name of Christianity, eg if a Priest, Bishop or Reverend splashes water over a sick person’s head, apply some oil on his forehead and leads a prayer resulting in that person being healed. They accept such supernatural powers, but when a traditional healer, makes a sick person drink some concoction, kill a hen and uses the blood to bath, and that person gets healed, or finally conceives after years of failing to have a baby, such supernatural powers are evil and should not be accepted by those who follow the western line.
    One Kenyan Bishop Gilbert Deya was helping through his ministries women to conceive, there was no condemnation, but if a traditional healer does the same it is viewed as powers of the evil.
    Westerners when they settled in Africa, they dismissed everything they did not understand as evil. Would like to carry on but time is against me.

  1. goldensparks says:

    Hi friend.. Interesting post.. Nice blog work.. keep it up..
    will drop by your site often.. Do find time to visit my blog and post your comments..
    Have a great day.. Cheers!!!

  1. Thokozile says:

    The controversial isssues to address are that:-
    (i) Should it be generally accepted by Africans that there are people with super-natural powers that they can use to heal or harm people?
    (ii) Should their operations (witches and witch doctors) be regulated such that their super-natural powers are used for the common good?
    (iii) Will any legislation or violation thereof involving super-natural operations meet the standard of proof required in a competent court of law to prosecute? i.e. proof beyond reasonable doubt.
    (iv) Should it be dismissed outright that such super-natural powers do not exist, and then prosecute anyone who believes otherwise, or accuse anyone of such powers?
    (v) Should such legislation overseeing the issues of super-natural powers (witchcraft) be upheld, but its enforcement and the presiding of such matters be delegated to traditional customary courts, headed by Chiefs, etc? otherwise bringing them before the mainstream judiciary and law courts will render it useless, since conviction is mostly unlikely.
    Finally is witchcraft a myth or fact? can people get rid of it by merely denying its existance?
    How does the casting away of demons by a priest compare to the casting away of evil spirits by a spirit medium or witchdoctor? Is it not the same act of applying supernatural powers? Hey food for thought!!

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